Old National Geographics  Bottom

  • Yokwe all,

    I just obtained, from a dusty bookstore in Columbus, Ohio, a couple old National Geographics with wonderful images of the Marshall Islands.

    Volume LXXXVII, number 3 (September, 1945) and Volume LXXXIX, number 5
    (May, 1946) both have wonderful images of the Marshall Islands. The Sept. '45 one is best, as it has several full color/full page photos. The May 1946 one is more about Micronesia in general, but mentions the upcoming atomic tests.

    I asked National Geographic about hosting the images on my website, as was told the cost is $200 per photo. (I'm even getting a discount, as I work at a university.) Don't expect to see the images any time soon... Still, if you see a stack of old National Geographics at a estate sale, auction or in an old book store, you may want to look through them.

    There is also a nice National Geographic from 1986, when the RMI became an independent country. That has a lot of great images of the RMI and FSM. It might be easier to find that the 1945 and 1946 editions.

    Also, Rongelap is featured in the National Geographic magazine: April 1998
    This is the link:
    http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/9804/index.html

    NGM Frontpage (only last 6 years are archived on-line)
    http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/

    An interesting story list in the 1945 NGM was that the Japanese imported Monitor Lizards to Aur. The idea was that the lizards would eat the rats (which probably arrived on a whaling ship decades before). Unfortunately, the lizards preferred chickens to rats, and became a problem.

    Shortly after arriving, the U.S. soldiers began shooting the lizards to help the ri-Aur.

    Some Monitor Lizard photos:
    http://home.adelphia.net/~zupich/addphoto.html

    My question is: are the lizards still there? Did it happen this way? Were the lizards a problem back then or now? Are/were they used for anything (food, bait, skins)? Could these be a potential resource (sales to pet-stores?)

    --

    I noticed a few probable distortions/misconceptions in the article. The U.S. had just been in the Marshalls for a few months when the first article came out. The author might not have had the full picture yet, and the country was still at war.

    One statement was that the Marshallese didn't have sails for their outriggers because the Japanese weren't supplying cloth. I suspect that the Marshallese could have made a traditional pandanus leaf sail if they wanted. The Japanese probably forbid sails in an effort to stop inter-atoll communication / spying. Even the Americans forbid Marshallese from sailing on the ocean, and kept them in lagoons, probably for the same reason. There were still bypassed atolls with armed Japanese soldiers on them.

    Any input? Any memories? When were the Marshallese allowed back on ocean waters? Had the Marshallese stopped making Pandanus sails (and clothes) by then?

    The articles were rather complimentary of the Marshallese, and rather negative towards tha Japanese (not surprisingly).


    Kommol ta ta,


    David


    Majuro, Marshall Islands, Images and Resources (frontpage)
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Majuro.html

    Historic (late W.W.II.) photos of Kwajalein
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Oldpix/Kwaj1.html

    Examples of Marshallese woven crafts
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Marshallese_crafts.html



    Laura and Woja, Majuro - the capital of the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), in the Central Pacific.
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Laura-Majuro.html
  • Yokwe all,

    I'm glad I was able to be of assistance Heather. I just found a 1967 NGM that has some nice information on Micronesia, and the RMI. There is a Bikini NGM from 1992 (I think) and Rongelap from 1997 (again, I'm not positive on the date off the top of my head.) I also have one from 1947 (again, off the top of my head) when the ri-Bikini are taken/escorted off of Bikini.

    There are some concerns that National Geographic, although sympathetic in its portrayal of the people of the world, generally supports American values/culture over others. I would doubt that there is a plot, in so much as the NG Society probably needs to cater to their main audience, which is Americans in the middle class and upper class.

    By the way, my campus library offered about 200 copies of NGMs from the 1960s to late 1990s to any recipients willing to use them (they're duplicates). If anyone in the RMI, or ri-Majol in the U.S. has a home for them, and can cover book rate postage, I can go get them. (E-mail me directly, and I'll go see if they're still available.)


    Bar Yokwe,


    David Huskins


    Survey of Marshallese Nutrition Choices:
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Health/Nutrition.html

    Majuro, Marshall Islands, Images and Resources:
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Majuro.html

    New images of Majuro, urban and rural
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Silk/

    Ken Butterfield's W.W.II. experiences on and above Majuro
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Butterfield/

    Historic (late W.W.II.) photos of Kwajalein
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Oldpix/Kwaj1.html

    My roster of RMI satellite images (hosted by NASA)
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/NASA/Satellite-Images-RMI.html

    Examples of Marshallese woven crafts
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Marshallese_crafts.html

    Laura and Woja, Majuro - the capital of the Republic of the Marshall
    Islands (RMI), in the Central Pacific.
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Laura-Majuro.html
  • Yokwe all,

    Head, I can understand not liking reptiles. Those don't bother me, but spiders do. (Why anyone would have a poisonous tarantula as a pet is beyond me.)

    While living in Singapore, my sister in law was summoned to a friend's apartment to dispose of a "beastie". The Singapore Police declined to get involved. Monitor lizards are common there, and find their way into buildings. The friend is British and had no experience with animals. She asked the farm-raised American to take care of the pest. As Joan had frequently encountered lizards under a foot long, just thought her friend was being hysterical.

    When she spotted a 4 foot hissing monster under her friend's coffee table, she opted to call the police (or Singapore's version of animal control) and explain just how big of a "beastie" this was. She wasn't about to shoo this creature into a grocery bag. (The authorities did come, eventually.)

    [][][]

    I just received a nice report on the Sea Turtles in the RMI. THe report was written by Mike McCoy, of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
    http://www.noaa.gov/

    The report was done for the Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority. (They probably have copies available.) I couldn't find the on-line version of this report on the web yet.

    Anyway, in addition to information about turtles, mangrove, W.W.II relics, and radiation effects, it lists what atolls have monitor lizards, and what atolls had monitor lizards, but they've been eliminated.

    Enewetak, Aur and Wotje are listed as still having monitor lizards, while Kwajalein and Majuro are listed as formerly having lizards.


    --


    David Huskins

    Majuro, Marshall Islands, Images and Resources:
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Majuro.html

    Maps of Micronesians working in the U.S.:
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Demos/

    Survey of Marshallese Nutrition Choices:
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Health/Nutrition.html

    Images of Majuro, urban and rural
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Silk/

    Ken Butterfield's W.W.II. experiences on and above Majuro
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Butterfield/

    Historic photos of Kwajalein
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Oldpix/Kwaj1.html

    Roster of RMI satellite images (hosted by NASA)
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/NASA/Satellite-Images-RMI.html

    Images of Marshallese woven crafts
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Marshallese_crafts.html

    Laura and Woja, Majuro
    http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Laura-Majuro.html

  • Are those the kind they have in Wotje...If they are, One way or another, those monitor lizards some how ended up in Wotje. I've seen many small ones on Ebeye in people's being raised as pets..All said they got them from Wotje..My niece one time in 96 came to visit us at home and I was sitting on a lazyboy and as she was entering...I got a glimpse of something that was resting on her shoulder...It was not making any movement, like it was a toy dinosaur she had placed it on her shoulder...so I did not pay much attention it...but when she got about a 3 feet away from where I was, I noticed that the head of the lizardlike toy was facing a different direction, but still it looke stiff...I decided to take closer look, just then, the lizard (like in slow motion) slowly moved its head towards my gaze and just when our eyes met...It whipped out its long tongue...(I am some who is afraid of Maj, snakes, and Aoep's and Korap koro, and labid toto -- but not kurape or Gecko) I flipped backwards with the lazyboy flipping along with me and I ran for my life.......Man those things are scarey..with their shinny slithery green skin and their tongues....But when i was a kid, my gradmother used to tell me stories about how people in Wotje (After the war) had problems with this creature preying on not just the nests of chickens and birds but the birds and chikens themselves. While the population on the main island (center) was eradicated by the people....They say in one of the outer islands or islet of Wotje, a large number and population of these reptiles roam free...This is where they people go and get their pets from....They say that really big ones are aggressive....but I am not sure....The big ones I've seen on TV are intimidating but never are aggressive towards the people filming them....My grandma and her generation refer to these creatures....KoKoj....And when they talked about them...(I guess they exaggerated so much) our wild and young minds conjure up images that makes the KoKoj a creepy and terrifying creature than it really is.
  • The soldiers must have eradicated the monitor lizards because the volunteer on Aur I knew never mentioned them in the 2 years she was there. There are many other lizard/gecko creatures though. Elon ke dri-Aur remaron konono kon lizard ko ilo Aur?
  • Thank you so much. David for posting all these stories and images for us ri-majol. As a pure rimajol I grew up in Majuro and don't know tooo much about the stories/history of the marshall islands. Thanks again for all these information which I would be sure to share with my kids who are pure marshallese but were not born in the marshall islands. These informations you posted are heaven sent. Mahalo Nui Loa (Thank you very much) and May God Bless U.
  • Thank you, David, for posting this because it has helped me very much. I included some of the images into my history report, which I'm going to present on Friday, 6/11/04.

    This group ROCKS! I have been able to find current events on the Marshall Islands to include into my report. I really appreciate the valueable information that is placed here!!!

    I wish you all well and good fortune :exclam:
  • David yeah thanks a lot for these rare images its very nice to see people who made us who we are today as a people...komol tata im Anij imaan ila ko am.
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